“The Bet” Our EXTENDED Response

What lessons do the banker and lawyer learn? Use information from the passage and what you already know to support your observations and conclusions.

OUR FIRST WRITTEN RESPONSE

There are a few lessons that the banker and lawyer learned.  At first, the lawyer believed life in prison was better than the death penalty.  He learned that life was miserable.  The banker learned to make a bet in order to prove that one is right is useless and that money was so important to him.

At first, the lawyer believed life in prison was better than the death penalty.   The lawyer was so confident that he was right, he raised the number of years he would stay in solitary confinement from 5 years to 15 years just to prove to the banker it was better to live than to die. After being in solitary confinement for nearly 15 years, the lawyer learned that life was miserable and he despised living. To lose the bet, the lawyer escaped 5 hours before the time was over.

The banker learned  important lessons. In the end, the banker learned to make a bet in order to prove that one is right is useless.   It was silly to make a bet where one looses such large sums of money. He also learned that money was far more important to him that being right.  In the end, he didn’t care about being right, he was more worried about the 2 million dollars and made sure he saved the lawyer’s letter just in case he needed to prove that the lawyer renounced the bet.

I know how both of these men felt. Sometimes I have felt the need to be right and argue my point. However, I would never place my freedom nor all of my money just to prove I was right.

OUR SECOND WRITING:

#2)  There are a few lessons that the banker and lawyer learned.  At first, the lawyer believed life in prison was better than the death penalty.  He learned that life was miserable and he despised living.  The banker learned to make a bet in order to prove that one is right is useless and that money was so important to him, he would even kill to keep it.

At first, the lawyer believed life in prison was better than the death penalty.  The evidence that supports this is when he said, “The death sentence and the life sentence are equally immoral, but if I had to choose between the death penalty and imprisonment for life, I would certainly choose the second. To live anyhow is better than not at all.” The lawyer was so confident that he was right, he raised the number of years he would stay in solitary confinement from 5 years to 15 years just to prove to the banker it was better to live than to die. After being in solitary confinement for nearly 15 years, the lawyer learned that life was miserable and he despised living. The evidence to support this is the lawyer wrote a letter stating how he despised life, freedom health and wisdom and therefore, he quit the bet and renounced the 2 million dollars. To purposefully lose the bet, the lawyer escaped 5 hours before the time was over.

The banker learned  important lessons. In the end, the banker learned to make a bet in order to prove that one is right is useless. The text states, “What was the object of that bet? What is the good of that man’s losing fifteen years of his life and my throwing away millions? Can it prove that the death penalty is better or worse than imprisonment for life? No, no. It was all meaningless.” This means that the banker realized this bet did not prove a thing.  It was silly to make a bet where one looses such large sums of money. He also learned that money was far more important to him that being right. He even planned to kill the lawyer so he wouldn’t lose. In the end, he didn’t care about being right, he was more worried about the 2 million dollars and made sure he saved the lawyer’s letter just in case he needed to prove that the lawyer renounced the bet.

I know how both of these men felt. Sometimes I have felt the need to be right and argue my point. However, I would never place my freedom nor all of my money just to prove I was right.

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